Training Contracts in Spain

The existence of a variety of contractual arrangements in Spain, among which training contracts are found, is a very useful tool for an employer developing a project in Spain. In making use of this extensive range of contractual arrangements, the employer can adapt the new working relationship that they wish to formalise to the labour and legislation framework that proves most fruitful.

Among the contractual arrangements to which we have referred, training contracts merit a special mention. Training contracts, which are contemplated under Spanish labour legislation, have two different types: the Internship Contract and the Contract for Training and Apprenticeship. The primary difference between the two of them is that for the Internship Contract, the employee already has a university degree in place, or professional training at higher or medium level. This degree qualifies the worker to practice in a particular field. With the Contract for Training and Apprenticeship, in contrast, the worker must still acquire the theoretical training and necessary practical experience to pursue the occupation.

Advantages of Training Contracts

Training contracts, still referring in both cases to labour contracts, certainly grant flexibility to a company since they do not require the establishment of an indefinite relationship with the employee. At the same time, they can provide significant economic advantages to the employer. However, it is necessary to bear in mind that not all parties can join the company via these types of contract since in both cases the law stipulates that the employee fulfil a series of prerequisites and characteristics – which will need to be individually assessed and appraised.

Being aware of the distinct types of training contract is thus essential, especially when integrating young people in the company by means of a working relationship. No matter the case or circumstances, training contracts should never be mistaken for the special status which governs the relationship between a business and its trainees,  insofar as this latter relationship is not a working one – and therefore is not subject to Spanish labour legislation.

Helena López

This article is not considered as legal advice

Mariscal Abogados

Mariscal Abogados is an international and multidisciplinary law firm with proven experience in diverse areas of the Law. Our working languages are English, German, French and Spanish. For any further enquiries please Contact us